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Putting Consecutive numbers into variables

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I data in this format a=[1;2;3;7;0;6;7;8;9;2;4;3;14;15;16;17;0;9;2];
what I need to accomplish is to put consecutive numbers into different variables...
in this case the expected outcome is a1=[1;2;3]; a2=[6;7;8;9]; a3=[14;15;16;17]; How do I
  1 Comment
Stephen23
Stephen23 on 4 Jul 2019
Edited: Stephen23 on 4 Jul 2019
"what I need to accomplish is to put consecutive numbers into different variables... "
Do NOT do this. Dynamically accessing variable names is one way that beginners force thmeselves into writing slow, complex, obfuscated, buggy code that is hard to debug:
Your code will be simpler and much more efficient if you simply use one container variable (e.g. a cell array, as my answer shows).

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Accepted Answer

Stephen23
Stephen23 on 4 Jul 2019
Edited: Stephen23 on 4 Jul 2019
>> A = [1;2;3;7;0;6;7;8;9;2;4;3;14;15;16;17;0;9;2];
>> D = diff([false;diff(A(:))==1;false]);
>> F = @(b,e)A(b:e);
>> C = arrayfun(F,find(D>0),find(D<0),'UniformOutput',false);
>> C{:}
ans =
1
2
3
ans =
6
7
8
9
ans =
14
15
16
17
You can access the data in the cell array C using basic indexing:
  3 Comments
DARLINGTON ETAJE
DARLINGTON ETAJE on 18 Jul 2019
F = @(b,e)A(b:e);
Please explain what b and e mean
are they variables...I don't know how to use them for a new dataset
Walter Roberson
Walter Roberson on 18 Jul 2019
b and are are dummy parameter names, similar to
function result = F(b, e)
result = A(b, e)
end

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