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The Ans Hack is a dubious way to shave a few points off your solution score. Instead of a standard answer like this
function y = times_two(x)
y = 2*x;
end
you would do this
function ans = times_two(x)
2*x;
end
The ans variable is automatically created when there is no left-hand side to an evaluated expression. But it makes for an ugly function. I don't think anyone actually defends it as a good practice. The question I would ask is: is it so offensive that it should be specifically disallowed by the rules? Or is it just one of many little hacks that you see in Cody, inelegant but tolerable in the context of the surrounding game?
Incidentally, I wrote about the Ans Hack long ago on the Community Blog. Dealing with user-unfriendly code is also one of the reasons we created the Head-to-Head voting feature. Some techniques are good for your score, and some are good for your code readability. You get to decide with you care about.
Chen Lin
Chen Lin
Last activity on 14 Jun 2024 at 13:50

We're thrilled to share an exciting update with our community: the 'Run Code' feature is now available in the Discussions area!
Simply insert your code into the editor and press the green triangle button to run it. Your code will execute using the latest MATLAB R24a version, and it supports most common toolboxes. Moreover, this innovative feature allows for the running of attached files, further enhancing its utility and flexibility.
The ‘run code’ feature was first introduced in MATLAB Answers. Encouraged by the positive feedback and at the request of our community members, we are now expanding the availability of this feature to more areas within our community.
As always, your feedback is crucial to us, so please don't hesitate to share your thoughts and experiences by leaving a comment.
goc3
goc3
Last activity on 13 Jun 2024 at 22:20

Base case:
Suppose you need to do a computation many times. We are going to assume that this computation cannot be vectorized. The simplest case is to use a for loop:
number_of_elements = 1e6;
test_fcn = @(x) sqrt(x) / x;
tic
for i = 1:number_of_elements
x(i) = test_fcn(i);
end
t_forward = toc;
disp(t_forward + " seconds")
0.10925 seconds
Preallocation:
This can easily be sped up by preallocating the variable that houses results:
tic
x = zeros(number_of_elements, 1);
for i = 1:number_of_elements
x(i) = test_fcn(i);
end
t_forward_prealloc = toc;
disp(t_forward_prealloc + " seconds")
0.035106 seconds
In this example, preallocation speeds up the loop by a factor of about three to four (running in R2024a). Comment below if you get dramatically different results.
disp(sprintf("%.1f", t_forward / t_forward_prealloc))
3.1
Run it in reverse:
Is there a way to skip the explicit preallocation and still be fast? Indeed, there is.
clear x
tic
for i = number_of_elements:-1:1
x(i) = test_fcn(i);
end
t_backward = toc;
disp(t_backward + " seconds")
0.032392 seconds
By running the loop backwards, the preallocation is implicitly performed during the first iteration and the loop runs in about the same time (within statistical noise):
disp(sprintf("%.2f", t_forward_prealloc / t_backward))
1.08
Do you get similar results when running this code? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.
Beneficial side effect:
Have you ever had to use a for loop to delete elements from a vector? If so, keeping track of index offsets can be tricky, as deleting any element shifts all those that come after. By running the for loop in reverse, you don't need to worry about index offsets while deleting elements.
Many MATLAB enthusiasts come Cody to sharpen their skills, face new challenges, and engage in friendly competition. We firmly believe that learning from peers is one of the most effective ways to grow.
With this in mind, the Cody team is thrilled to unveil a new feature aimed at enriching your learning journey: the Cody Discussion Channel. This space is designed for sharing expertise, acquiring new skills, and fostering connections within our community.
On the Cody homepage, you'll now notice a Discussions section, prominently displaying the four most recent posts. For those eager to contribute, we encourage you to familiarize yourself with our posting guidelines before creating a new post. This will help maintain a constructive and valuable exchange of ideas for everyone involved.
Together, let's create an environment where every member feels empowered to share, learn, and connect.
Ned Gulley
Ned Gulley
Last activity on 13 Jun 2024 at 20:22

Twitch built an entire business around letting you watch over someone's shoulder while they play video games. I feel like we should be able to make at least a few videos where we get to watch over someone's shoulder while they solve Cody problems. I would pay good money for a front-row seat to watch some of my favorite solvers at work. Like, I want to know, did Alfonso Nieto-Castonon just sit down and bang out some of those answers, or did he have to think about it for a while? What was he thinking about while he solved it? What resources was he drawing on? There's nothing like watching a master craftsman at work.
I can imagine a whole category of Cody videos called "How I Solved It". I tried making one of these myself a while back, but as far as I could tell, nobody else made one.
Here's the direct link to the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoSmO1XklAQ
I hereby challenge you to make a "How I Solved It" video and post it here. If you make one, I'll make another one.
goc3
goc3
Last activity on 13 Jun 2024 at 20:11


Many times when ploting, we not only need to set the color of the plot, but also its
transparency, Then how we set the alphaData of colorbar at the same time ?
It seems easy to do so :
data = rand(12,12);
% Transparency range 0-1, .3-1 for better appearance here
AData = rescale(- data, .3, 1);
% Draw an imagesc with numerical control over colormap and transparency
imagesc(data, 'AlphaData',AData);
colormap(jet);
ax = gca;
ax.DataAspectRatio = [1,1,1];
ax.TickDir = 'out';
ax.Box = 'off';
% get colorbar object
CBarHdl = colorbar;
pause(1e-16)
% Modify the transparency of the colorbar
CData = CBarHdl.Face.Texture.CData;
ALim = [min(min(AData)), max(max(AData))];
CData(4,:) = uint8(255.*rescale(1:size(CData, 2), ALim(1), ALim(2)));
CBarHdl.Face.Texture.ColorType = 'TrueColorAlpha';
CBarHdl.Face.Texture.CData = CData;
But !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! We cannot preserve the changes when saving them as images :
It seems that when saving plots, the `Texture` will be refresh, but the `Face` will not :
however, object Face only have 4 colors to change(The four corners of a quadrilateral), how
can we set more colors ??
`Face` is a quadrilateral object, and we can change the `VertexData` to draw more than one little quadrilaterals:
data = rand(12,12);
% Transparency range 0-1, .3-1 for better appearance here
AData = rescale(- data, .3, 1);
%Draw an imagesc with numerical control over colormap and transparency
imagesc(data, 'AlphaData',AData);
colormap(jet);
ax = gca;
ax.DataAspectRatio = [1,1,1];
ax.TickDir = 'out';
ax.Box = 'off';
% get colorbar object
CBarHdl = colorbar;
pause(1e-16)
% Modify the transparency of the colorbar
CData = CBarHdl.Face.Texture.CData;
ALim = [min(min(AData)), max(max(AData))];
CData(4,:) = uint8(255.*rescale(1:size(CData, 2), ALim(1), ALim(2)));
warning off
CBarHdl.Face.ColorType = 'TrueColorAlpha';
VertexData = CBarHdl.Face.VertexData;
tY = repmat((1:size(CData,2))./size(CData,2), [4,1]);
tY1 = tY(:).'; tY2 = tY - tY(1,1); tY2(3:4,:) = 0; tY2 = tY2(:).';
tM1 = [tY1.*0 + 1; tY1; tY1.*0 + 1];
tM2 = [tY1.*0; tY2; tY1.*0];
CBarHdl.Face.VertexData = repmat(VertexData, [1,size(CData,2)]).*tM1 + tM2;
CBarHdl.Face.ColorData = reshape(repmat(CData, [4,1]), 4, []);
The higher the value, the more transparent it becomes
data = rand(12,12);
AData = rescale(- data, .3, 1);
imagesc(data, 'AlphaData',AData);
colormap(jet);
ax = gca;
ax.DataAspectRatio = [1,1,1];
ax.TickDir = 'out';
ax.Box = 'off';
CBarHdl = colorbar;
pause(1e-16)
CData = CBarHdl.Face.Texture.CData;
ALim = [min(min(AData)), max(max(AData))];
CData(4,:) = uint8(255.*rescale(size(CData, 2):-1:1, ALim(1), ALim(2)));
warning off
CBarHdl.Face.ColorType = 'TrueColorAlpha';
VertexData = CBarHdl.Face.VertexData;
tY = repmat((1:size(CData,2))./size(CData,2), [4,1]);
tY1 = tY(:).'; tY2 = tY - tY(1,1); tY2(3:4,:) = 0; tY2 = tY2(:).';
tM1 = [tY1.*0 + 1; tY1; tY1.*0 + 1];
tM2 = [tY1.*0; tY2; tY1.*0];
CBarHdl.Face.VertexData = repmat(VertexData, [1,size(CData,2)]).*tM1 + tM2;
CBarHdl.Face.ColorData = reshape(repmat(CData, [4,1]), 4, []);
More transparent in the middle
data = rand(12,12) - .5;
AData = rescale(abs(data), .1, .9);
imagesc(data, 'AlphaData',AData);
colormap(jet);
ax = gca;
ax.DataAspectRatio = [1,1,1];
ax.TickDir = 'out';
ax.Box = 'off';
CBarHdl = colorbar;
pause(1e-16)
CData = CBarHdl.Face.Texture.CData;
ALim = [min(min(AData)), max(max(AData))];
CData(4,:) = uint8(255.*rescale(abs((1:size(CData, 2)) - (1 + size(CData, 2))/2), ALim(1), ALim(2)));
warning off
CBarHdl.Face.ColorType = 'TrueColorAlpha';
VertexData = CBarHdl.Face.VertexData;
tY = repmat((1:size(CData,2))./size(CData,2), [4,1]);
tY1 = tY(:).'; tY2 = tY - tY(1,1); tY2(3:4,:) = 0; tY2 = tY2(:).';
tM1 = [tY1.*0 + 1; tY1; tY1.*0 + 1];
tM2 = [tY1.*0; tY2; tY1.*0];
CBarHdl.Face.VertexData = repmat(VertexData, [1,size(CData,2)]).*tM1 + tM2;
CBarHdl.Face.ColorData = reshape(repmat(CData, [4,1]), 4, []);
The code will work if the plot have AlphaData property
data = peaks(30);
AData = rescale(data, .2, 1);
surface(data, 'FaceAlpha','flat','AlphaData',AData);
colormap(jet(100));
ax = gca;
ax.DataAspectRatio = [1,1,1];
ax.TickDir = 'out';
ax.Box = 'off';
view(3)
CBarHdl = colorbar;
pause(1e-16)
CData = CBarHdl.Face.Texture.CData;
ALim = [min(min(AData)), max(max(AData))];
CData(4,:) = uint8(255.*rescale(1:size(CData, 2), ALim(1), ALim(2)));
warning off
CBarHdl.Face.ColorType = 'TrueColorAlpha';
VertexData = CBarHdl.Face.VertexData;
tY = repmat((1:size(CData,2))./size(CData,2), [4,1]);
tY1 = tY(:).'; tY2 = tY - tY(1,1); tY2(3:4,:) = 0; tY2 = tY2(:).';
tM1 = [tY1.*0 + 1; tY1; tY1.*0 + 1];
tM2 = [tY1.*0; tY2; tY1.*0];
CBarHdl.Face.VertexData = repmat(VertexData, [1,size(CData,2)]).*tM1 + tM2;
CBarHdl.Face.ColorData = reshape(repmat(CData, [4,1]), 4, []);
We are thrilled to announce the grand prize winners of our MATLAB Flipbook contest! This year, we invited the MATLAB Graphics Infrastructure team, renowned for their expertise in exporting and animation workflows, to be our judges. After careful consideration, they have selected the top three winners:
1st place - Rolling fog / Tim
Judge comments: Creative and realistic rendering with well-written code
Judge comments: Festive and advanced animation that is appropriate to the current holiday season.
Judge comments: Nice translation of existing shader logic to MATLAB that produces an advanced and appealing visual effect.
In addition, after validating the votes, we are pleased to announce the top 10 participants on the leaderboard:
Congratulations to all! Your creativity and skills have inspired many of us to explore and learn new skills, and make this contest a big success!
Today, he got dressed for work to design some new dog toy-making algorithms. #nationalpetday
Vonny Groose
Vonny Groose
Last activity on 9 Jun 2024 at 16:53

Mari is helping Dad work.
Chen Lin
Chen Lin
Last activity on 9 Jun 2024 at 16:33

Drumlin Farm has welcomed MATLAMB, named in honor of MathWorks, among ten adorable new lambs this season!
While searching the internet for some books on ordinary differential equations, I came across a link that I believe is very useful for all math students and not only. If you are interested in ODEs, it's worth taking the time to study it.
A First Look at Ordinary Differential Equations by Timothy S. Judson is an excellent resource for anyone looking to understand ODEs better. Here's a brief overview of the main topics covered:
  1. Introduction to ODEs: Basic concepts, definitions, and initial differential equations.
  2. Methods of Solution:
  • Separable equations
  • First-order linear equations
  • Exact equations
  • Transcendental functions
  1. Applications of ODEs: Practical examples and applications in various scientific fields.
  2. Systems of ODEs: Analysis and solutions of systems of differential equations.
  3. Series and Numerical Methods: Use of series and numerical methods for solving ODEs.
This book provides a clear and comprehensive introduction to ODEs, making it suitable for students and new researchers in mathematics. If you're interested, you can explore the book in more detail here: A First Look at Ordinary Differential Equations.
goc3
goc3
Last activity on 7 Jun 2024 at 2:56

There are a host of problems on Cody that require manipulation of the digits of a number. Examples include summing the digits of a number, separating the number into its powers, and adding very large numbers together.
If you haven't come across this trick yet, you might want to write it down (or save it electronically):
digits = num2str(4207) - '0'
That code results in the following:
digits =
4 2 0 7
Now, summing the digits of the number is easy:
sum(digits)
ans =
13
The study of the dynamics of the discrete Klein - Gordon equation (DKG) with friction is given by the equation :
In the above equation, W describes the potential function:
to which every coupled unit adheres. In Eq. (1), the variable $$ is the unknown displacement of the oscillator occupying the n-th position of the lattice, and is the discretization parameter. We denote by h the distance between the oscillators of the lattice. The chain (DKG) contains linear damping with a damping coefficient , whileis the coefficient of the nonlinear cubic term.
For the DKG chain (1), we will consider the problem of initial-boundary values, with initial conditions
and Dirichlet boundary conditions at the boundary points and , that is,
Therefore, when necessary, we will use the short notation for the one-dimensional discrete Laplacian
Now we want to investigate numerically the dynamics of the system (1)-(2)-(3). Our first aim is to conduct a numerical study of the property of Dynamic Stability of the system, which directly depends on the existence and linear stability of the branches of equilibrium points.
For the discussion of numerical results, it is also important to emphasize the role of the parameter . By changing the time variable , we rewrite Eq. (1) in the form
. We consider spatially extended initial conditions of the form: where is the distance of the grid and is the amplitude of the initial condition
We also assume zero initial velocity:
the following graphs for and
% Parameters
L = 200; % Length of the system
K = 99; % Number of spatial points
j = 2; % Mode number
omega_d = 1; % Characteristic frequency
beta = 1; % Nonlinearity parameter
delta = 0.05; % Damping coefficient
% Spatial grid
h = L / (K + 1);
n = linspace(-L/2, L/2, K+2); % Spatial points
N = length(n);
omegaDScaled = h * omega_d;
deltaScaled = h * delta;
% Time parameters
dt = 1; % Time step
tmax = 3000; % Maximum time
tspan = 0:dt:tmax; % Time vector
% Values of amplitude 'a' to iterate over
a_values = [2, 1.95, 1.9, 1.85, 1.82]; % Modify this array as needed
% Differential equation solver function
function dYdt = odefun(~, Y, N, h, omegaDScaled, deltaScaled, beta)
U = Y(1:N);
Udot = Y(N+1:end);
Uddot = zeros(size(U));
% Laplacian (discrete second derivative)
for k = 2:N-1
Uddot(k) = (U(k+1) - 2 * U(k) + U(k-1)) ;
end
% System of equations
dUdt = Udot;
dUdotdt = Uddot - deltaScaled * Udot + omegaDScaled^2 * (U - beta * U.^3);
% Pack derivatives
dYdt = [dUdt; dUdotdt];
end
% Create a figure for subplots
figure;
% Initial plot
a_init = 2; % Example initial amplitude for the initial condition plot
U0_init = a_init * sin((j * pi * h * n) / L); % Initial displacement
U0_init(1) = 0; % Boundary condition at n = 0
U0_init(end) = 0; % Boundary condition at n = K+1
subplot(3, 2, 1);
plot(n, U0_init, 'r.-', 'LineWidth', 1.5, 'MarkerSize', 10); % Line and marker plot
xlabel('$x_n$', 'Interpreter', 'latex');
ylabel('$U_n$', 'Interpreter', 'latex');
title('$t=0$', 'Interpreter', 'latex');
set(gca, 'FontSize', 12, 'FontName', 'Times');
xlim([-L/2 L/2]);
ylim([-3 3]);
grid on;
% Loop through each value of 'a' and generate the plot
for i = 1:length(a_values)
a = a_values(i);
% Initial conditions
U0 = a * sin((j * pi * h * n) / L); % Initial displacement
U0(1) = 0; % Boundary condition at n = 0
U0(end) = 0; % Boundary condition at n = K+1
Udot0 = zeros(size(U0)); % Initial velocity
% Pack initial conditions
Y0 = [U0, Udot0];
% Solve ODE
opts = odeset('RelTol', 1e-5, 'AbsTol', 1e-6);
[t, Y] = ode45(@(t, Y) odefun(t, Y, N, h, omegaDScaled, deltaScaled, beta), tspan, Y0, opts);
% Extract solutions
U = Y(:, 1:N);
Udot = Y(:, N+1:end);
% Plot final displacement profile
subplot(3, 2, i+1);
plot(n, U(end,:), 'b.-', 'LineWidth', 1.5, 'MarkerSize', 10); % Line and marker plot
xlabel('$x_n$', 'Interpreter', 'latex');
ylabel('$U_n$', 'Interpreter', 'latex');
title(['$t=3000$, $a=', num2str(a), '$'], 'Interpreter', 'latex');
set(gca, 'FontSize', 12, 'FontName', 'Times');
xlim([-L/2 L/2]);
ylim([-2 2]);
grid on;
end
% Adjust layout
set(gcf, 'Position', [100, 100, 1200, 900]); % Adjust figure size as needed
Dynamics for the initial condition , , for , for different amplitude values. By reducing the amplitude values, we observe the convergence to equilibrium points of different branches from and the appearance of values for which the solution converges to a non-linear equilibrium point Parameters:
Detection of a stability threshold : For , the initial condition , , converges to a non-linear equilibrium point.
Characteristics for , with corresponding norm where the dynamics appear in the first image of the third row, we observe convergence to a non-linear equilibrium point of branch This has the same norm and the same energy as the previous case but the final state has a completely different profile. This result suggests secondary bifurcations have occurred in branch
By further reducing the amplitude, distinct values of are discerned: 1.9, 1.85, 1.81 for which the initial condition with norms respectively, converges to a non-linear equilibrium point of branch This equilibrium point has norm and energy . The behavior of this equilibrium is illustrated in the third row and in the first image of the third row of Figure 1, and also in the first image of the third row of Figure 2. For all the values between the aforementioned a, the initial condition converges to geometrically different non-linear states of branch as shown in the second image of the first row and the first image of the second row of Figure 2, for amplitudes and respectively.
Refference:
  1. Dynamics of nonlinear lattices: asymptotic behavior and study of the existence and stability of tracked oscillations-Vetas Konstantinos (2018)
Hello and a warm welcome to everyone! We're excited to have you in the Cody Discussion Channel. To ensure the best possible experience for everyone, it's important to understand the types of content that are most suitable for this channel.
Content that belongs in the Cody Discussion Channel:
  • Tips & tricks: Discuss strategies for solving Cody problems that you've found effective.
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Please direct such comments to the Comments section on the problem or solution page itself.
We hope the Cody discussion channel becomes a vibrant space for sharing expertise, learning new skills, and connecting with others.
Hans Scharler
Hans Scharler
Last activity on 31 May 2024 at 14:59

Spring is here in Natick and the tulips are blooming! While tulips appear only briefly here in Massachusetts, they provide a lot of bright and diverse colors and shapes. To celebrate this cheerful flower, here's some code to create your own tulip!
Mike
Mike
Last activity on 31 May 2024 at 7:45

Dear members, I’m currently doing research on the subject of using Generative A.I. as a digital designer. What our research group would like to know is which ethical issues have a big impact on the decisions you guys and girls make using generative A.I.
Whether you’re using A.I. or not, we would really like to know your vision and opinion about this subject. Please empty your thoughts and oppinion into your answers, we would like to get as much information as possible.
Are you currently using A.I. when doing your job? Yes, what for. No (not yet), why not?
Using A.I., would you use real information or alter names/numbers to get an answer?
What information would or wouldn’t you use? If the client is asking/ordering you to do certain things that go against your principles, would you still do it because order is order? How far would you go?
Who is responsible for the outcome of the generated content, you or the client?
Would you still feel like a product owner if it was co-developed with A.I.?
What we are looking for is that we would like to know why people do or don’t use AI in the field of design and wich ethical considerations they make. We’re just looking for general moral line of people, for example: 70% of designers don’t feel owner of a design that is generated by AI but 95% feels owner when it is co-created.
So therefore the questions we asked, we want to know the how you feel about this.
Check out this episode about PIVLab: https://www.buzzsprout.com/2107763/15106425
Join the conversation with William Thielicke, the developer of PIVlab, as he shares insights into the world of particle image velocimetery (PIV) and its applications. Discover how PIV accurately measures fluid velocities, non invasively revolutionising research across the industries. Delve into the development journey of PI lab, including collaborations, key features and future advancements for aerodynamic studies, explore the advanced hardware setups camera technologies, and educational prospects offered by PIVlab, for enhanced fluid velocity measurements. If you are interested in the hardware he speaks of check out the company: Optolution.
One of the starter prompts is about rolling two six-sided dice and plot the results. As a hobby, I create my own board games. I was able to use the dice rolling prompt to show how a simple roll and move game would work. That was a great surprise!
With the release of MATLAB R2023a, we also are giving you early access to the new MATLAB Desktop. This includes Dark Mode! Download via Add-on Explorer in MATLAB or find here on File Exchange.
These are some of the many enhancements and new features of the new desktop:
  • Dark mode / theme support - Change the colors of the desktop by selecting a dark theme.
  • Updated layout - Quickly access tools and change your layout using the sidebar.
  • Expanded search capabilities - Easily find actions, settings, and resources using the new universal search box.
  • Figure toolstrip - Use the new figure toolstrip to easily modify annotations, text, and line styles, and view generated code.
  • Keyboard and screen reader accessibility support - Use a screen reader to interact with the Command Window, Editor and desktop tools.
  • Enhanced MATLAB Projects workflows - Collaborate using an improved user interface, manage multiple repositories using the Branch Manager, and investigate project hierarchies using the new Dependency Analyzer view.
MATLAB Dark Mode
Have fun trying it out and let us know what you think!